The report explores different dimensions of how the Internet is evolving and transforming the economy and society in Indonesia. The Internet is present, to some degree, in most aspects of Indonesian commerce and society. Currently, the Internet accounts for 1.6% of Indonesia’s gross domestic product with some sectors of the Indonesian economy already recognising the potential of the more sophisticated roles that the Internet can play. The Internet’s contribution to the Indonesian economy is forecast to grow at a rate three times that of the overall economy over the next five years and is expected to account for at least 2.5% of GDP by 2016.

Deloitte | Australia | Deloitte Access Economics | The Connected Archipelago

Excellent Research on the Internet Economy in Indonesia - The Connected Archipelago

You can download the full pdf report here.

While Alf and the team work on the new website, I decided to put in place a Search Engine Optimisation and traffic generation strategy. So I find myself now dusting off my Market Samurai license, logging back into Adwords, scouring for good content writers and beginning to have a really great time.

In the series of posts to follow, I will try to share some of my experiences and learnings. And to kick off this series on SEO, heres a list of the tools I will be using during my SEO adventure.

Getting back on the SEO Path – Some great SEO Tools | The Constructivists Speak

All you Need to Know about Flowcharting

We thought of breaking up the usual string of UML diagram posts with a simple post onFlowcharting. If you have been a regular reader of our blog, you would have been privy to a great deal of information on flowcharts, like this one – Learn to unleash the power of flowcharts. While flowcharts are excellent when it comes to business, it would be prudent at some point to pay attention to some of the best practices with regard to flowcharts, in general.

       

You’ve probably already seen this title in one form or the other, but the truth is that there are some uses that need to be considered besides the obvious. As you may be aware, a flowchart is a visual representation, which shows you a sequence of operations that are to be performed in order to get the solution to a problem. While flowcharts may be applied to computer solutions, they can be used for a myriad of processes, as well. Flowcharts are an excellent tool when it comes to business, education and even something as myriad as a recipe or a how-to guide.

Misunderstanding flowchart symbols is certainly something that could leave you in a quandary, especially if you are not too aware of the relevance of flowcharting symbols. While there is no strict protocol as such when it comes to using boxes, circles, diamonds or such symbols in drawing a flowchart, they do help you to illustrate and make sense of the types of events in the chart with more clarity. Described below are standard symbols along with a visual representation right below.

  1. Data object – The Data object, often referred to as the I/O Shape shows the Inputs to and Outputs from a process.
  2. Rectangle - This is used to represent an event which is controlled within the process. Typically this will be a step or action which is taken.
  3. Diamond - Used to represent a decision point in the process. Typically, the statement in the symbol will require a `yes’ or `no’ response and branch to different parts of the flowchart accordingly.
  4. Document - The Document object is a rectangle with a wave-like base. This shape is used to represent a Document or Report in a process flow.
  5. Rounded box – This is used to represent an event which occurs automatically. Such an event will trigger a subsequent action, for example `receive telephone call, or describe a new state of affairs.
  6. Stored data - This is a general data storage object used in the process flow as opposed to data which could be also stored on a hard drive, magnetic tape, memory card, of any other storage device.
  7. Manual input - This object is represented by rectangle with the top sloping up from left to right. The Manual Input object signifies an action where the user is prompted for information that must be manually input into a system.
  8. Direct data – Direct data object in a process flow represents information stored which can be accessed directly. This object represents a computer’s hard drive.
  9. Circle - Used to represent a point at which the flowchart connects with another process. The name or reference for the other process should appear within the symbol.
  10. Internal storage – This is an object which is commonly found in programming flowcharts to illustrate the information stored in memory, as opposed to on a file.
  11. Predefined process – This allows you to write one subroutine and call it as often as you like from anywhere in the code.

While learning the various symbols that are associated with flowcharts are rather important, you need to also remember that there are certain guidelines in flowcharting that deserves some respect as well. The following are some guidelines in flowcharting:

1. Proper Form is Essential: In drawing a proper flowchart, all necessary requirements should be listed out in logical order.

2. Clarity is Paramount: The flowchart should be clear, neat and easy to follow. There should not be any room for ambiguity in understanding the flowchart.

3. Stick to the Right Direction: The usual direction of the flow of a procedure or system is from left to right or top to bottom.

4. Standard for Flow Lines: Ideally just one flow line should come out from a process symbol.  While only one flow line should enter a decision symbol, around three flow lines (depending on the answer) should leave the decision symbol. Additionally, only one flow line is utilized together with a terminal symbol.

5. Be Concise, not Copious: Write within standard symbols briefly.

6. Logic precedes Everything: If you are dealing with a complex flowchart then use connector symbols to minimize the number of flow lines. Ditch the intersection of flow lines to ensure effectiveness and better communication. It is imperative that your flowchart has a logical start and finish.

That wraps up this post, in the meanwhile, do get in touch with us here, if you do have any queries. For more interesting tips and trends on diagramming, stay tuned to this space.

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Say hello to our versatile 3D objects!

As promised in our last post, where we unveiled Creately’s forward thinking Text capabilities, we are now thrilled to offer a fresh new perspective, in this post, on our intuitive KObjects, namely 3D versions of the CubeCylinder and Cone. So why is this such BIG news? We’ve listed ‘em out for you below.

1. Cool Features

   

What we actually did was to create 3D objects that have a list of features associated with it. As you can see below, you can change the Position & Size of these objects along with the 3D Angle andCube Depth as well.

    

2. Such versatile Fun!

Click and drag either one of the 3D objects onto the editor and you are sure to have oodles of fun, creating and designing diagrams, like a rocket blasting off into space, a pencil and even the Tower of Hanoi below.

We’ve already established that creating complex diagrams, such as UML diagramswireframes andmockups are easy. But Creately has also quite a bit of a fun side to it, as seen by the screen shots above.

 

3. Better usability = Simple but Beautiful Diagrams

What better way to highlight this sentiment than to draw a system architecture diagram. Having a 3D look and feel to the whole diagram is certainly something that makes it look better, more interesting and beautiful.


That wraps up this post, in the meanwhile, do spread the word to your friends and peers and other aficionados of diagramming. For more interesting announcements and tips and trends on diagramming, stay tuned to this space.

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Creately offers forward thinking Text capabilities!

We break our usual slew of knowledge-based posts with a very exciting announcement today. With the latest Creately release, we’ve added on some really smart features that is sure to make your diagramming experience easier and rewarding. While we do have two awesome features to talk about, we’ll concentrate on just one in this post, with the next feature described in a subsequent post later on, during this week. So without further ado, discover Creately’s multiple text feature on lines! To help you understand the potential this gives you, scour through the benefits illustrated below.

    

1. Add multiple text to lines

To make the whole process of plugging in extra text has been made easier. So easy, in fact, all you need to do is double click on the relevant line to create text. Even cooler is that you can create any amount of text on the line by double clicking at any point. Plus, editing text is also an easy endeavor; all it requires is double-clicking on the text you want to edit. Observe this super-intuitive convenience in action below.

2. Easy drag functionality

So, now you can create any amount of multiple text on lines. But we’ve also taken pains to ensure that there is unhindered usability afforded with this feature as well. With most diagrams precision is key, which is why clicking and dragging text anywhere on the line to position and place your text makes the art of diagramming so much easier with Creately.

3. Experience multiplicity with UML associate connector type

While multiple text can be added onto any type of line in a variety of diagrams, we’ve also ensured that there is multiplicity with regard to associate connector type in UML Class Diagrams. So, now there is no need to plug in awkward and mismatched textboxes when all you need to do is plug in multiplicity with just a click or two. Simply change the type of connector when connecting two Class objects to “Associate” and the multiplicity options will be available.

There you have it. A simple feature that is packed with a level of potency that is sure to make diagramming faster, easier, more intuitive and versatile. Remember to spread the good news!

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